Food

Today’s menu:

Breakfast: porridge (oats/milk/water),
Lunch: 2 x Lincolnshire sausages,
Mid-afternoon: low-fat yoghurt,
Supper (& post-supper): Chicken Tikka Masala and rice, low-fat yoghurt, apple

plus, of course, many cups of tea (and a latte)! I note all this mainly for my own benefit, to try and better understand how my sugar varies. Every day is broadly similar, although I do like to snack on brown-breaded toast (from which I abstained today).

To counter this, my steps for the day are 4,500 (right now), but this does include a drop-in at the hospital. Other days can be far more sedentary. It’s unheard of, these days, for me to get to 10,000 steps (which was effortless before the stroke).

Back on the subject of food, I was in the hospital coffee shop today (ordering my latte) and the guy in front baulked at this jam-tart-sized mince pie thing, priced at £1.79. Fair enough, but he also had one of their (instantly-forgettable) Bakewell Tarts for £1.39, not to mention a cappucino for, I think, £2.75. I mean, all vastly overpriced, including my own drink (£2.50), but I find it interesting to see that fine line where something jumps from “acceptable” to “unacceptable”.

Charitiy Adverts

When I first had my stroke, obviously it affected my brain. One aspect of this was my perception of emotional things. For example, I found myself in tears watching an old James Herriot episode. I could rationalise that these people (and the dog!) were just acting out a storyline, and that the storyline itself was most probably fiction, but nevertheless…

One of the things that happens during recovery is a gradual “hardening”, back to the point I was at before the stroke ever happened. The same things are right, the same things are wrong, it’s just that my coping ability has changed.

To that end, every other ad on tv at the moment is an appeal on behalf of a charity. People are desparate, animals are desparate. But you become immune to it. You realise that every cause is a good cause. but we all only have so much cash to throw around, so we need to make choices on how much we give, and who we give it to. By implication, this also means that there will be many causes where we have to say, “I’m sorry, but I can’t help you”.