Drop In 27/06/18

I did my drop-in this week. Visiting the ward.

The Stroke Ward moved premises around a month or six weeks ago. They’ve moved a couple of times in recent months, although none of the moves seem to have led to upgraded facilities. Anyway, the latest premises contained a room designated a “Quiet Room”, a quiet area for relatives to take a pause.

We (the charity) also used the room both as a place to rendezvous, and a place to display a lot of our literature. I mean, strokes obviously take some time for people to get their heads around, so the Stroke Association’s small A5 pamphlets, covering a variety on different topics, are quite useful. They would be to me, anyway, if I were a relative.

Anyway, I rocked up on Wednesday and found that the Quiet Room door was closed, and a staff meeting was going on inside. Furthermore, the door now had sheets of paper with calendars on them, nice neat hourly slots throughout the week. So clearly, some enterprising member of staff has hit upon a new room to have meetings in.

Tough luck, relatives.

For two hoots, I must admit I’d stop volunteering there. Whatever benefit relatives might gain from having this resource, somebody has decided that the clinical need is greater. I do end up wondering why I should give my time to chat to relatives, when they are so far down everybody else’s list. But the reason I offered to volunteer in the first place is because I didn’t think their standards were particularly brilliant. So I’m not really surprised, but was disappointed enough to contact the hospital again when I get home. I doubt I’ll hear anything back.

Bluetooth

Only a few weeks ago (here), I posted about the swanky new glucometer I’d been given by my local surgery. Bluetooth. Syncs with my phone. In theory.

In practise, I haven’t been able to get it to sync for the last few days. I go into the app on my phone, and say “sync”. I go into the Bluetooth settings on my phone, and say “connect”. Nothing. I unpair and re-pair the two devices. Nothing.

This all makes me realise exactly why I like the glucometer I bought. It’s not the same glucometer, of course, that I’ve had all this time, but I keep going back and buying same make, same model time after time. The reason? It has a USB port at one end. I take it out of the bathroom, walk it over to the laptop, plug it in…..and it just works. The beauty, really, of physical connections – there’s no faffing about wondering why the wireless connection doesn’t work.

So I think my flirt with this Bluetooth device might be over. That’s a shame, not least since I could also get the testing strips from the local surgery, and don’t have to pay any more for them. In contrast, with the Beurer (USB) machine, I need to order the strips privately. Of course, the Bluetooth machine is still a perfectly good monitor – it is only a few weeks old and conforms to all the correct standards – but, if it won’t connect to anything, I fear it is now my “backup” monitor.

Motivations

It’s interesting – I wanted to leave the EU at our referendum, which was two years ago yesterday. My reasons (I’ve discussed this in previous posts) were – and still are – that I am represented unfairly within the EU organisation.

Even today, the issue will be guaranteed to split a room in half. I’m very interested, not really to know how people voted, but to know why they voted the way they did. It frustrates me a bit (inasmuch as I do get frustrated in any of this) that many remain arguments run along the lines, “don’t you realise how poor we’ll be?”. The one thing that people don’t get is that it was never about economics. People just don’t get it.

As it happens, I’m unconvinced either by arguments that I’ll be poorer, or by arguments that I’ll be richer, just because the future is as yet unwritten. I ran a company for almost 25 years, and the most security I ever had in all that time was my month’s notice, and I got by. I did very well, in fact. I don’t really pretend that I’m any more gifted than the next person, so I don’t see why anything is necessarily different for UK PLC.

Anyway, I was watching the news on C4 last night (which I think is by far the best UK-produced news programme, by the way) and there was a debate, specifically about immigration.

Now, I’m very free’n’easy about immigration. I like that we’re multicultural, I think I live in an enriched society as a result. But C4 had done a poll, which revealed that 60-odd percent of <> wanted to reduce immigration, even if it meant that jobs went unfilled. Just thinking about my local hospital, they had an emergency ward which could not open last winter for lack of staff, and yet people (according to the C4 poll) are happy with this. Even though British people might have suffered as a result.

So, just as many remainers “don’t get it” about my motivation for wanting Brexit, maybe on immigration, I don’t get it?