Sugar Spreadsheet

My wife reckons that nobody is interested in this, but I’ll share it nonetheless.

The spreadsheet where I record all my sugar is here. I’ve shared it to my web site folder, so hopefully you can see it. It comes down as a .xlsm file, which can be recognised by Excel 2016, which you get from Office 365. XLSM presumably means “a spreadsheet containing macros”.

The spreadsheet has about 4 rows of dummy data, just so you can see what you have to enter. You just need to enter the time, date and value. Other columns are optional i I record how much insulin I take, and what monitor I use to measure – and those with a grey background are calculated.

To calculate statistics, just hit the button in the top-right, and follow the instructions. I’ve put a little macro under there which will ask for the first row you want to calculate stats for, and the last row. It’ll then work out when was “one month ago”, and write the number of entries, the average and the standard deviation in columns E, F and G. Please note that where you just have one reading for the last month, the mean will just be that reading. And, you need at least 2 readings during the last month in order to calculate a standard deviation, so with just this sample data, each cell in Column G shows an error (which will go away as you add that second row).

The macro is very basic, its main purpose is to work out which days are within the last month. it is quite crude, will expect the data to be in chronological order, and will behave unreliably id not. I really developed it for myself rather than for public consumption.

Software provided on a “best endeavours” basis. The macro is written in a language called VBScript, which I’ve never ever seen in the last 10 years! You can view and change the source code, in any case.

Job Hunt

As part of my job search, I signed up to a site called reed.co.uk, and set up a search. I asked for all jobs within a 10-mile radius. I know from other job search engines that this search yields 20-25 jobs per day, many of which are at the local hospital. So, imagine my surprise when their search email told me that, in the course of just 24 hours, there were more than 350 jobs!

I saw straight away that their search contained jobs that were not 10 miles from Salisbury, but 50! I mean, what is the use in that? If I’d wanted to see jobs that were 50 miles away, that’s how I’d have set up the search. Someone has obviously decided that it is better for their site to send out great swathes of information, even though it is irrelevant, than to send a smaller amount of useful information. Answering my own question, presumably this allows them to say to advertisers, hey, we pushed your add to a zillion people! no matter that to most of those people, the ad was useless.

It kind-of brings into sharp focus exactly who this site is aimed at. They’re obviously a company, out to make a profit for their shareholders, and the way they make money is per imprint. Any service they appear to offer to candidates is purely by-the-by. You think you’re signing up for one thing, and yet their goal is something else. It’s a bit like Facebook – you think you’re taking part in some nonsense quiz, and all of a sudden Cambridge Analytica are telling you who to vote for.

So my dilemma is straightforward. Do I continue with these emails, in which case I’m headed for a lot of wasted time manually sifting through their false positives? Or do I can the search, write it off as a waste of time, and hope that if that dream job does come along, I find out about it anyway from one of my other searches?