Infallible

I hate it when people consider themselves infallible, because none of us is.

I remember a while ago, I’d been volunteering up at the local hospital for a year or so. There’s a specific aspect of strokes (I’ll try not to say which because I’d prefer this post to be anonymous), and a training course had been organised aimed at members of staff. “There’s a few spare places. Why don’t you come along?” I thought that it might well be useful to learn more about the subject, so accepted.

The first half of the course was to be the theory. The second half, a group of people who’d been afflicted with this aspect of stroke had been invited in to be guinea pigs, so we could test our new-found knowledge.

On the appointed day, I arrived nice and early, and introduced myself to a somebody who happened to be lurking around the reception area, who I think I later found out was one of the doctors. “Hi, I’m a volunteer from the Stroke Association, I’m here to do the training”. “Oh, there is training today but you’re an hour too early.” That’s funny. I note stuff in my diary as soon as I find out about it, but maybe I’d made a mistake? So I thanked then and actually went to the coffee shop for the next hour.

When I went back, an hour later, it transpired that I’d missed the first half of the course. This woman had heard the words “course” and “volunteer”, had isolated them together and not bothered to listen to the rest of the sentence. She had assumed that, rather than being a course attendee, I was one of the people who’d been recruited to test the attendees in the second half of the course,

To say I was pissed off is an understatement. If this woman had been diligent, she could have checked, but no, she was sure that I was wrong. I could have been more assertive, I suppose, but I did realise that I might have indeed have got the time wrong.

It’s funny because I’ve since recognised this trait several times in doctors – I must be right because I’m infallible. With the benefit of hindsight (i.e. I now know that I was correct) I should’ve just gone home, or not have bothered making the journey in the first place. I have at least learned from experience  – if anybody from there asks me about future training, my response is always a quick “no, thanks”.

Author: Stroke Survivor UK

Formerly, designed and developed IT systems for banks, but had a stroke in 2016, aged pre-50! I have returned to developing from home, but some of my time is also spent volunteering with the UK charities Age UK (www.ageuk.org.uk) and the [UK] Stroke Association (www.stroke.org.uk).

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