Blogger vs. WordPress

I read a new blog. I like it because it makes me think about different things. Not just think, but learn. With some of the things, I’m definitely out of my comfort zone.

Take the last post. This guy is American, so talks about the US system. He also talks politics, where it has a US flavour.

I mean, I’m happy to get involved in “universal” politics, but when it has a foreign tint on it, I’m out of my comfort zone.

Yesterday, he started talking about Trump. Trump’s pretty much “universal” politics, because we’ve all heard of him, and we all have a view. When you talk about Trump, you don’t need an additional paragraph to explain who he is (or, particularly, what his views are). But talk about Congressman A, I’m pretty lost. So the debate yesterday involved my learning a bit about the Electoral College over there. Actually, as far as I’m concerned, it has exactly the same problems as the EU. I’ve posted about Malta before. We had European Elections as recently as 2019, numbers might have tweaked a bit, but nothing fundamentally has changed. They’ve obviously don’t think there’s a problem, and there’s certainly no interest in fixing anything. That’s why I still want to leave – I want to be a part of some organisation which will represent every European equally, and until they get can get that most fundamental of fundamentals right, I’m not interested.

Anyway, I’m not going to get bogged down in Brexit.

This chap writes on WordPress. the raw application is actually open source (which is free and, well, open), I write on Blogger, proprietary, owned by Google, but free all the same. I’m trying to work out the difference between the two, whether one is better than the other. I’m still very much learning here, but my understanding is that, at its core, WordPress is a content management system. You can just download it to run on your own web server. I checked my Microsoft host, no mention that they support WordPress, although they say they support all the things that WordPress says it requires. . But they’re really a programming platform – you wouldn’t really use my company just to run an off-the-shelf program, you’d do something more bespoke.

But that’s the thing. WordPress is an application. In its purest form, wordpress.org, open source, free, all the things the web should be. People who use it, have to run their site somewhere. Enter wordpress.com. However not-for-profit the .org is, the .com most certainly isn’t! They want £80-something to host my blog for two years. So, I’m a bit incredulous. Blogger comes for free, and as far as I can tell, meets my needs, but if I want to use wordpress.com, looks like I’ll have to subscribe to something. I’m still trying to get my head around that “subscription” bit! There are other providers, of course, when all’s said and done it’s just plain-old hosting. I doubt it is rocket science to run the WordPress app on your server. I even found some providers that claimed a free service. But of course, these are hosting companies who want you to buy their premium service, so how good is the “free” version going to be?

It does, at least, look like I could export my entire blog from Google. On WordPress.com, at least. I’ve been less successful with the free providers, so far, but I’ll keep trying. My blog currently has hundreds of posts going back over 2 years, I’m not willing to lose them – it’ll have to be someone who can import the Blogger content. I guess I have some reading to do, not least the answer to my very first question – whether I’d get a better blog by switching service.

I don’t know. Something I need to find out about. Something I need to work out whether I do want to spend the money. A task for the coming days!

Author: Stroke Survivor UK

For many years I designed and developed IT systems for big banks. I had a stroke a couple of years ago, aged pre-50! I have returned to developing things from home, not quite at the levels I used to, but saves on the travel! My time is also filled with some voluntary work for the UK charities Age UK and the [UK] Stroke Association. Incidentally, I created this account with the alias "sca11y" but have since aligned it with the name of my blog.

One thought on “Blogger vs. WordPress”

  1. Actually one of the things about this exercise is that I've found a couple of settings on my own blog, which seem to make it more accessible to WordPress users. It was set up (presumably the default) so that only people with Google accounts could comment, but I've found a setting to allow anybody to comment. So now, I'll watch the spam flow in!

    Like

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