Too Good To Be True?

I was unbelievably pleased that my migration from Blogger happened so smoothly. Within a day, probably, I had something ready to share with the world. I suppose the abortive attempt a few weeks ago helped out, just in terms of having a pre-idea of how to set things up.

I didn’t quite go the whole way with WordPress, just as I never did with Blogger. I bought the domain name through my usual registrar (I’ve probably got ten domains with them). They allow me full management. For the Blogger site, I set up a few things to point to Blogger, so when I made the change, I reset these to point to WordPress. Because I own it, I can make these changes without having to ask so-and-so to do such-and-such.

WordPress still likes to manage a few things. When I performed the migration, I thought it was really smart, because things like my email worked perfectly, right from the off. WordPress must’ve looked up the old data and brought it across.

At this point, it gets technical. When you set up gmail.com (or any other email server), you have to set two things up, your incoming server’s address and your outgoing server’s address. For each one, you publish the server’s IP address. When you’re huge like gmail, you’ll have different addresses for each.

So imagine somebody opens their email program. When they’re picking up their emails, they’ll connect to one of the servers.

Then imagine that they then decide to send an email to joe.bloggs@gmail.com instead, their email program looks at the other address, so it knows where to send the message.

I own strokesurvivor.me.uk, so the plan was to change the web site settings from Blogger to WordPress but to keep the mail settings the same.

I could see it was all working, so I probably didn’t look closely enough at the settings. I assumed that wp had been really smart and pulled the old settings across, and I was good the whole weekend.

Today, though, my email program stopped picking up messages. It gave an error when it tried to read them. That was weird because people could send to me without any problems. My current wp settings mean that wp alone is sending me 50-odd emails per day!

So I looked closely at these settings, and here’s the weird thing: some of them had been set up, some hadn’t. The settings for somebody to send stuff to me were there, but not the ones my email program uses to receive.

Fortunately, my blog’s email is all hosted on my mail server, so I’ve been able to log directly on to that to see messages, and nothing was lost. And, I’ve made sure that the necessary settings are added in wp. Lo and behold, my email program is fine now.

A hiccup, no more. I can kind-of understand how I managed to pick up email after I migrated, because changes take time to propagate around the world, but I’m stumped, why wp picked up some of my original settings and not others.

Author: Stroke Survivor UK

Formerly, designed and developed IT systems for banks, but had a stroke in 2016, aged pre-50! I have returned to developing from home, but some of my time is also spent volunteering with the UK charities Age UK (www.ageuk.org.uk) and the [UK] Stroke Association (www.stroke.org.uk). I created this account with the alias "sca11y" but have since aligned it with the name of my blog.

2 thoughts on “Too Good To Be True?”

  1. I always had mx1.strokesurvivor.me.uk and mx2.strokesurvivor.me.uk set up with my registrar. WordPress carried those over no problem, so the mail account kept on receiving emails throughout. I also set up mail.strokesurvivor.me.uk, which my email client uses to pick up my email, which didn’t get carried across. I had to set it up yesterday. So the problem was just that my email program couldn’t hit my mail server.

    Because I want to let wp control my web site, but I want to use my own email, I kinda thought there might be a few issues.

    Like

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