Vive la Différence

Way back in the nineties, I found an excellent US comedian called Emo Phillips. He was quite prominent back them, although I don’t hear much of him now. I can’t blame him for getting tired of criss-crossing the Atlantic.

One clip of Emo is funny, but I think also has a serious message.

The serious message here is that no matter how in common we are with somebody else, sooner or later, we’re different. How deep you want to look is up to you – whether you’re looking for similarity or separateness, you’ll find what you’re after.

I don’t know, I pro-actively searched for people after the stroke, looking for other stroke survivors, for I spent a long time thinking that I was on my own. Sound familiar?

After I reached out, I gradually started to meet other survivors in person, however, and we were all differenet.

One guy had his stroke back in the early Nineties – you wouldn’t know. But he still wears a FES device to help him along. I tried one of those for a while. Another guy looked okay, but had had a couple of strokes, with a heart attack thrown in for good measure. His disability was quite minimal, but he was conscious of his voice. I think my voice has changed, but my tech still understands me when I speak. Another guy – it was his peripheral vision, someone else was the opposite of me – gets by with her hand, but can’t walk.

So, all different, but all the same.

At the moment, I celebrate particularly when I get something from my old life back. Last week, just a walk in the forest. We went to a town, to a café, for the first time since the stroke. Any of that sound familiar?

At the same time, I’m scared that there are parts of me that I won’t get back. I’m still not driving, or doing paid work, for example. It’s been almost four years, now. Sound familiar? But I’m fortunate because the brain I used to use to make my living, that did come back.

Lastly, people on here. People with all kinds of back-stories. I don’t know how some of them came through what they’ve come through. Coming through, I bet everybody would put it in the present. Maybe they think that about me? I’ll let you into a secret – I’m nothing special. I got put into this shitty situation, which I didn’t ask for, and I’m just doing my best to put my life back together. Sound familiar?

Author: Stroke Survivor UK

Formerly, designed and developed IT systems for banks, but had a stroke in 2016, aged pre-50! I have returned to developing from home, but some of my time is also spent volunteering with the UK charities Age UK (www.ageuk.org.uk) and the [UK] Stroke Association (www.stroke.org.uk).

2 thoughts on “Vive la Différence”

  1. “I got put into this shitty situation, which I didn’t ask for, and I’m just doing my best to put my life back together.” I think, to one degree or another, we are just doing the best we can to keep our lives together.”

    Liked by 1 person

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